Ep. 201: “The Future of Research” Featuring Drs. Bria
Macklin, Matthew Sinton, and Leili Rohani

Guests:

In this special episode of the Stem Cell Podcast, we speak with three postdocs from different parts of the world about their research in and outside of the lab.

Dr. Bria Macklin is a Postdoc at the Gladstone Institutes. Her PhD research at Johns Hopkins used functional assays to characterize the interactions between different vascular cell types in 3D. Her current lab uses stem cell differentiation and morphogenesis to engineer three-dimensional, multicellular systems.

Dr. Matthew Sinton is a Postdoctoral Research Assistant at the University of Glasgow. In his PhD, Dr. Sinton developed a new human pluripotent stem cell model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and used it to explore the effects of hepatic lipid accumulation on mitochondrial energy metabolism. His current postdoctoral project centers around TH2 immunity, and how it is regulated by infection-associated metabolic changes.

Dr. Leili Rohani is a Postdoc at the Centre for Lung Innovation at the University of British Columbia. Her research focuses on engineering heart tissues for cell therapy, and she is a science communication and Twitter enthusiast.

Featured Products and Resources:

The Stem Cell Science Round Up

Microvessels Improve Islet Transplantation – Microvessels isolated from adipose tissue improved cell survival and glucose responses of human islets and hESC-derived pancreatic cells in mouse models of Type 1 diabetes.

Beta Cell Biogenesis – Ngn3-expressing ductal cells are a source of adult β cell neogenesis in homeostasis and diabetes.

Whole-Body Regeneration in Planaria – Scientists found that all three germ layers respond to amputation in Schmidtea mediterranea.

From Nose to Knee: Cartilage Grafts for Osteoarthritis – Researchers generated cartilage grafts from the nasal chondrocyte and used them to treat osteoarthritis in mice, sheep, and two human patients.

Stem Cell-Derived Steak  – Scientists 3D printed muscle, fat, and vascular cell fibers to construct a Wagyu-like steak.

Photo Reference: Courtesy of Drs. Bria Macklin, Matthew Sinton, and Leili Rohani

Read original article here.